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Luxurious cars tax demo underway in Accra

A group calling itself Concerned Spare Parts dealers are staging a demonstration in Accra over the raised tax on what government describes as luxurious vehicles.

The spare parts dealers say they will petition the President over tax hike if their request is not headed.

The luxury vehicle tax was introduced by the Finance Minister, Ken Ofori Atta, in the 2018 mid-year review budget.

Vehicles with engine capacities of 3.0 – 3.5 litres attracts an annual tax of 1,000 Ghana cedis; those with engine capacities of 3.6 – 4.0 litres will pay 1,500 cedis annually; while 4.1 litres and above are to pay an annual tax of 2000 Ghana cedis.

Commercial vehicles are exempted from this policy.

Speaking to Francis Abban on the Morning Starr Thursday, Chairman of the group Kwabena Adjei said the President must listen to them or bare the consequences in next year’s polls.

“We have some concerns with the Luxury tax. Since the inception of the tax, engines above 2.9 are not being purchased and that is affecting sales. We have petitioned the Finance Ministry, Parliamentary Committee in charge of finance. As we speak, we have not received any form of response. After this demonstration, if there is no change at all, we will be heading to court.

“We are using the so called ‘luxurious’ cars to demonstrate. I don’t understand how toilet puller cars, ‘borla’ cars all qualify as luxury cars,” he fumed.

Source: Ghana/Starrfm.com.gh/103.5FM

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